Accessible Presentations – Live Presentations Intro

Difficult Presentations

Minions "What?!"

Image from Minions – What?! YouTube video

We’ve all been there – presentations which are boring, long, incomprehensible, or irrelevant. However, even an engaging speaker using high quality, meaningful images which are perfectly timed may be stumped by a poorly lit or too hot room, older technology than expected or a noisy group in the adjacent room.

Be sure to prep your presentation in such a way as to minimize difficulties for your audience to see, read, hear and/or understand. Sometime outside factors contribute to problems, so try to anticipate them. If you’re able, check out the location of your presentation in advance, and practice using the room and available technology.

Handouts

The Power of Handouts (muscled super hero arm)

Image from http://middlebororeview.blogspot.com/2013/04/the-power-of-handouts.html

You have several decisions to make when it comes to handouts. Your live presentation may include some key words and visuals to reinforce your talk or lesson. However, your handouts may range from non-existent to detailed. You may want people to take notes or focus on the speaker or discussion instead of taking notes. You may want people to take their own notes or use those you provide. You may want to distribute handouts in advance or after your presentation. You may choose to post handouts online or hand out paper copies. Consider: What option will provide the best complement to your talk or lesson? What option will best meet the needs of your audience or students?

When it comes to making your handouts as accessible as possible, providing an accessible, electronic document is helpful because this gives your audience options for use on a mobile device, magnification or text-to-speech applications, and printing as needed. If you know your audience includes someone who is deaf or hard-of-hearing, you may consider providing a script or outline for that individual. If you know you have someone in your audience has low vision, you may consider providing a large print version of any physical handouts. Be sure to choose a readable sized font for any handouts.

Check out the OCTOBER 18 blog for more notes on readability and handouts.

Come back after Thanksgiving as we cover physical space – mobility, visuals and sound.

Also, be sure to check out these Learning Styles & Active Learning Boot Camp workshops this month (November). Details and registration are available on our CAPE TeamUp Calendar.

  • Creating Engaging Presentations with Matt Wiley
  • Active Learning Tools with Deb Butler
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