Meetings

Over the last two weeks, five Vice President of Instruction candidates visited VC and participated in open forum question and answer sessions.  I attended each forum and listened to each candidate.  However, there is one question that I wish had been asked of each:

How do you feel about meetings?

My lexicographical colleague, Matt Wiley, recently presented a workshop on Motivational Meetings.  I was unable to attend his sessions, but he did model what he learned in a recent Strategic Planning meeting.  He also shared an interesting story about Steve Jobs who reportedly released people from meetings if they had nothing to contribute.  As someone who attends a great many meetings and chairs a few others, I feel that this is an area in which I could greatly improve which is why I was so intrigued by this article for alternatives to meetings (I also remembered this article about standing meetings from a few years ago).

Now don’t get me wrong – I don’t want to stand for all of my meetings or cut out all of them either.  I actually enjoy meetings when we can brainstorm ideas and solve problems.  The challenge lies in turning the other types of meetings that are often required into productive meetings for all participants.

I believe that this is one area that I will be investigating further.  If anyone has any suggestions for books or articles that I may find helpful, I’d appreciate if you would leave the information in the comments below.

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3 comments

  1. THEY HAVE A COOKIE OVEN?!

    Ahem. Getting back to the point… That’s an interesting article. Like you, I don’t think that all the ideas are great all the time, but it’s good to consider new ideas.

    This article is aimed at museums, but it’s got applicable ideas for workplaces in general: http://designthinkingformuseums.net/2014/08/12/what-museums-can-learn-from-improv/

    Take care of each other, make your colleagues look good, build on ideas. Those are all good values!

    Like

  2. No article to share yet, but I think some wise advice came from a card that was read at our Strategic Plan team meeting: “No more meetings to talk about what to talk about at another meeting.”

    Like

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